Forum Posts

Their Quintessence
Feb 26, 2022
In Film
WandaVision is a show about grief. It is a series that has become, somewhat unexpectedly, perfect for the moment. As we're trapped in our Covid bubbles—likely grieving loved ones and friends, missing the lives we once had—we're watching Wanda trapped in a self-made bubble of her own trauma. These emotions are real, they're relatable, and they're human in a way that nothing else in the Marvel Cinematic Universe has been before.
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Their Quintessence
Feb 26, 2022
In Film
K-dramas provide a great escape from the harsh reality of life’s problems and stressors. Often times, we come across a K-drama that presents us with a situation or line that really speaks to us and is comforting and healing. There is almost a quote in every K-drama out there that can offer some sort of healing or introspective thinking, but here a few that might offer you some positive vibes.
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Their Quintessence
Feb 24, 2022
In Books
Jessica Johnson wrote an Orwell prize-winning short story about an algorithm that decides school grades according to social class and her A-level English was downgraded by a similar algorithm and she was not accepted for English at St. Andrews University.
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Their Quintessence
Feb 24, 2022
In Music
Dolly Parton's amusement park, announced that the company will cover 100% of tuition, fees and books for any Dollywood employee who chooses to pursue further education. This will be offered to all seasonal, part-time, and full-time employees, and they can enroll day 1 of their employment.
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Their Quintessence
Feb 24, 2022
In Film
When cast in "Big Fat Liar", John Cho was asked to do his role with an accent. He turned down the part, saying he didn't want young people thinking it was okay to laugh at someone's accent.
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Their Quintessence
Feb 24, 2022
In Anime
Some recommendations to help get you through quarantine.
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Their Quintessence
Feb 24, 2022
In Gaming
Take your time, you got this.
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Their Quintessence
Feb 23, 2022
In TWICE
Fans that attended TWICE’s previous tour TWICELIGHTS pre-pandemic are familiar with the benevolent concert experience, creating instant friendships with fans they met via social media platforms and embracing free hand-made gifts made by generous ONCE. But for newer fans that joined the fandom in the last three years and amidst the pandemic, this concert is foreseen to be a vivid core memory that will forever imprint to your heart. Attending a K-Pop concert is, without a doubt, an out-of-body adventure that should be experienced at least once in your life. But attending a TWICE concert, in particular; it’s a justifiable cause for cleansing the body and soul of any negativity that dares impede your life. TWICE’s discography and live performances will indisputably make an impact on your life, as you live vicariously through concert clips and Instagram posts in the coming days after the concert. The bright, cheerful, and lovely members of TWICE are a true testament to what it means to be a nurturing and authentic role model to fans all over the globe. If you’re one of the lucky ONCE attending this tour, you’ll be grateful to have been blessed by their presence and be impressed with their outstanding dedication to their craft as K-pop idols. Thank you TWICE, for bringing love and spirit into every space you gracefully make your own; ONCE are very proud of your hard work and will support you to the very end.
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Their Quintessence
Feb 18, 2022
In TWICE
“The group will touch people's hearts twice, once through the ears, and once again through the eyes.” –Park Jin Young, Meaning of the group This is TWICE
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Their Quintessence
Jan 19, 2022
In Discussions
Watching “The Legend of Korra” nowadays is a lesson in bittersweet victories: It’s a b enchmark for how far queer representation has come and how far it still has to go. “Life is complicated,” Underwood said. “We want our media to be as complex as we are.” There has been a marked increase in LGBTQ+ representation in kids’ shows and notably different types of queer characters living freely onscreen. In 2018, GLAAD created a new category for Outstanding Kids & Family Programming and this year expanded the category to ten nominees in light of all the new representation. These days, it’s more than just a “very special episode.” Portrayals of queer life on kids’ TV has never encompassed quite as much of the LGBTQ+ initialism as it does now. Legend of Korra Walked So Queer Characters on Kids’ TV Could Kiss “The Legend of Korra” remains iconic for representation, showing young children and teens that a queer woman of color is capable of being the heroine of the story. The show should not be regarded as the end-all for queer representation but rather as a bold starting point to radical inclusion in kids media. The Nickelodeon cartoon's legendary finale sealed the romance between Korra and Asami. We asked queer animators about the doors that moment opened for LGBTQ+ representation. “The Legend of Korra” isn’t the reason I came out. But the finale made me feel less alone when I felt isolated from everyone around me. If it wasn’t for “Korra” and queer representation in other shows I was watching at the time I may not have grown comfortable enough with my sexuality to come out in 12th grade. And looking back, if more children’s television had included queer characters, I may never have had to come out at all. That’s what Korra and Asami’s sweet, simple hand-holding inspired. The Legend of Korra ended on a small, quiet moment that mirrored this couple’s own journey of finding each other. But that moment made its intentions abundantly clear. As Korra and Asami turned to face each other, hand in hand, certain that they would be accepted, so too did Konietzko and DiMartino seemingly turn towards the audience, hoping for a broader acceptance of LGBTQ+ content in animation. And turns out, it worked. All of the good that mainstream cartoons like Adventure Time, Steven Universe, and She-Ra and the Princesses of Power have brought to the world can be traced back to Korra’s one, revolutionary grasping of hands.
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Their Quintessence
Jan 19, 2022
In Discussions
“Finding some type of community to be a part of has been vital for people’s mental health survival and for their physical well-being during the pandemic,” said Janina Scarlet, a clinical psychologist who uses Superhero Therapy, evidence-based therapy that incorporates characters from pop culture to treat anxiety, depression, and PTSD. There’s also no right way to become a fan. Sometimes it’s love at first sight, sometimes it’s a slow burn, and sometimes you’re born into it. No one fandom activity — fanfiction, cosplay, fan art, fan videos, stan accounts, conventions — matters more than another. All that matters is “you engage with it because of your emotional attachment,” said Paul Booth, a professor of communication at DePaul University. Throughout social distancing, many people are experienced the benefits of fandom. 
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Their Quintessence
Jan 19, 2022
In Discussions
Gita Jackson from Motherboard said: It's not surprising that people are extra bored right now. We don't have to recover from holiday travel because we have all been at home, as we have been every goddamn day for what feels like 300 years. People have so much time to actually finish the shows you start watching, if one has become a particular comfort and you've watched it all, seeking out fanfiction might be a new way to prolong that pleasure. I got into fanfiction during the long waits for new Harry Potter books, reading novel length fiction that I'd eventually like more than the actual series. If you're new to Archive of Our Own, I hope you discover your own longtime, beloved fanfiction, like my personal favorite Harry Potter fic, the Shoebox Project, or at least enjoy the latest chapter of Heat Waves.
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Their Quintessence
Jan 19, 2022
In Discussions
She uses the power of narrative, compassionate listening, and equal attention to data and diverse perspectives to cultivate spaces and stories that are vulnerable, open-hearted, strategic, and connecting. Shelly’s work focuses on building inclusivity. Her creative fiction and nonfiction celebrates diverse characters and perspectives, and her activism centers on expanding civic engagement and social justice. Most recently, she has been a nonprofit fundraiser, a communications manager, a Jewish professional education editor, a child and adolescent therapist, and a reproductive justice advocate. She currently works as a digital strategist and editor. Shelly's Writing.
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Their Quintessence
Oct 10, 2021
In Discussions
This series is a global phenomenon that works as a powerful metaphor about society and underlines its flaws. “Koreans love to be No. 1, but No. 1 at the cost of kind of airing your dirty laundry is a somewhat different thing," said Professor CedarBough Saeji. Fantasies of luck and wealth turn these people against each other, and all this betrayal plays out in deeply personal, practically intimate ways. The violence and compelling characters makes it easy to overlook the theme at the show’s heart—the explosive growth of debt and economic inequality in contemporary Korea. Kind and pure Ali has become a fan favorite, but his backstory of abuse and exploitation is still a reality for many. While Squid Game might be on track to become Netflix's biggest ever show, the Korean drama was previously rejected by local studios for a decade before being picked up by Netflix. Squid Game director Hwang Dong-hyuk has spoken about the intensity of the show's production, revealing that he lost multiple teeth while filming the series. Most smartly, Squid Game taps into a cultural obsession with gameshows. The players are being watched, but the viewer is only one step removed, and it’s impossible not to put yourselves in their shoes. An episode of backstories makes it clear that anyone can fall into debt through bad luck, while the visuals are full of familiar touchstones. There are maze-like corridors, tinkling soundtracks and oversized slides, like the world’s worst children’s party. Within this world, writer and director Hwang Dong-hyuk sets up compelling dilemmas – would you betray your friend to escape death? – and lets them play out in agonising stretches. For Hwang, the show's narrative reflects the "competitive society" we live in today. "This is a story about losers," he said -- those who struggle through the challenges of everyday life and get left behind, while the "winners level up." But Hwang brushes off the criticism by referring to his notes for the project, originally conceived as a feature film, in 2008. “I freely admit that I’ve had great inspiration from Japanese comics and animation over the years,” he said. “When I started, I was in financial straits myself and spent much time in cafes reading comics including ‘Battle Royale’ and ‘Liar Game.’ I came to wonder how I’d feel if I took part in the games myself. But I found the games too complex, and for my own work focused instead on using kids’ games.” Many commentators have contextualized “Squid Game” within South Korea’s societal woes. Its rascally but luckless protagonist, Gi-hun (played by Lee Jung-jae), owes hundreds of thousands of dollars to loan sharks after being laid off from a manufacturing job years ago and having a subsequent bid at entrepreneurship go belly up. (Not helping matters: his gambling addiction.) In a country where indebtedness has been skyrocketing — one recent estimate has the nation’s total household debt now exceeding its GDP — Gi-hun, a sad-sack divorcé partly supported by his elderly mother, is an Everyman. Why 'Squid Game' is resonating around the world By now you've probably heard of "Squid Game," a dark social satire in which desperately impoverished people are enticed to compete in children's games with deadly stakes for the chance to win a life-changing cash prize. By creating a world where every contestant is so desperate that they are reduced to a childlike state, literally and figuratively, the show produces feelings in the viewer that hark back to your own playground memories: picking teams, sharing food, joining gangs, making friends, confused lust, rejection, acceptance and, ultimately, survival. Unlike many examples of this genre, Squid Game is set in our contemporary reality, which makes its scathing critique of capitalism less of a metaphor for the world we live in and more of a literal depiction of life under capitalism. #squidgameonnetflix
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Their Quintessence
Jun 26, 2021
In Discussions
A few examples for you. Family Don't End with Blood: Cast and Fans on How Supernatural Has Changed Lives Supernatural has encouraged fans to change their lives, from getting “sober for Sam” to escaping a cult to pursuing lifelong dreams. But fans aren’t the only ones who have been changed. The actors who bring the show to life have also found, in the show and its community, inspiration, courage, and the strength to keep going when life seemed too hard. How YouTubers and Streamers are Changing the Face of Charity The world of influencers can be hard to comprehend, especially for those who exist outside of it, but shares similarities with the traditional media anyone can understand. Like any hit TV show or Netflix series, content creators provide a space where viewers can go after a hard day and know that their favorite gamer, vlogger, cosplayer or whatever waiting for them. That consistency creates a bond that is quite literally worth something. Supporting your favorite streamer feels good, supporting their charity feels even better. It's always nice to give back. Twice Just Want To Make You Happy “Going through pharmacy school was probably one of the toughest times in my life and TWICE was what always kept my spirits up,” says Misa, a Canadian fan who provides TWICE-specific news and Korean-English interpretation through their account @Misayeon. “I listened to their songs while studying, watched their [live-streams] during breaks, and they just always helped create these carefree moments where you can be happy and stress free. I've been a fan of other K-pop groups in the past, but there's something about TWICE that's special and intrinsic to only them. They're very genuine people and they have a way of radiating joy to others just by being themselves, whether on stage or offstage.”
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Their Quintessence

Their Quintessence

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